Ozone Layer Depletion

The Earth’s ozone layer is mainly found in the lower portion of the stratosphere from approximately 20 to 30 km (12 to 19 mi).

Ozone depletion describes two related phenomena observed since the late 1970s: a steady decline of about four percent in the total amount of ozone in Earth’s stratosphere (the ozone layer), and a much larger springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone around Earth’s polar regions. The latter phenomenon is referred to as the ozone hole. There are also springtime polar tropospheric ozone depletion events in addition to these stratospheric phenomena.

The main cause of ozone depletion and the ozone hole is man-made chemicals, especially man-made halocarbon refrigerants, solvents, propellants, and foam-blowing agents (chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs), HCFCs, halons), referred to as ozone-depleting substances (ODS). These compounds are transported into the stratosphere by the winds after being emitted at the surface. Once in the stratosphere, they release halogen atoms through photodissociation, which catalyze the breakdown of ozone (O3) into oxygen (O2). Both types of ozone depletion were observed to increase as emissions of halocarbons increased.

Ozone depletion and the ozone hole have generated worldwide concern over increased cancer risks and other negative effects. The ozone layer prevents most harmful UVB wavelengths of ultraviolet light (UV light) from passing through the Earth’s atmosphere. These wavelengths cause skin cancer, sunburn, and cataracts, which were projected to increase dramatically as a result of thinning ozone, as well as harming plants and animals. These concerns led to the adoption of the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which bans the production of CFCs, halons, and other ozone-depleting chemicals.

The ban came into effect in 1989. Ozone levels stabilized by the mid-1990s and began to recover in the 2000s. Recovery is projected to continue over the next century, and the ozone hole is expected to reach pre-1980 levels by around 2075. The Montreal Protocol is considered the most successful international environmental agreement to date.

Ozone layer depletion is one of the most serious problems faced by our planet earth. It is also one of the prime reasons which are leading to global warming. Ozone is a colourless gas which is found in the stratosphere of our upper atmosphere. The layer of ozone gas is what which protects us from the harmful ultraviolet radiations of the sun. The ozone layer absorbs these harmful radiations and thus prevents these rays from entering the earth’s atmosphere. Ultraviolet radiations are high energy electromagnetic waves emitted by the sun which if enters the earth’s atmosphere can lead to various environmental issues including global warming, and also a number of health related issues for all living organisms. Thanks to the ozone layer which protects us from these harmful rays.

Main Causes of Ozone Layer Depletion

The most important reason for ozone layer depletion is the production and emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). This is what which leads to almost 80 percent of the total ozone layer depletion.

Also, low temperatures, increase in the level of chlorine and bromine gases in the upper stratosphere are some of the reasons that leads to ozone layer depletion.

There are many other substances that lead to ozone layer depletion such as hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Such substances are found in vehicular emissions, by-products of industrial processes, aerosols and refrigerants. All these ozone depleting substances remain stable in the lower atmospheric region, but as they reach the stratosphere, they get exposed to the ultra violet rays. This leads to their breakdown and releasing of free chlorine atoms which reacts with the ozone gas, thus leading to the depletion of the ozone layer.

Effects of ozone layer depletion

Let us see a few possible effects of the ozone layer depletion on the earth’s environment and also on the plants and animals. The depletion of ozone layer allows entering of UV rays from sun into the earth’s atmosphere which is associated with a number of health related and environmental issues. Let us see its major impacts on human beings

Skin Cancer: exposure to UV rays from sun can lead to increased risk for developing of several types of skin cancers. Malignant melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common cancers caused by exposure to UV rays.

Eye Damage:UV rays are harmful for our eyes too. Direct exposure to UV rays can lead to Cataract problems, and also Photokeratitis or snow blindness.

Damage to Immune system: our immune system is also highly vulnerable to UV rays. Increased exposure to UV rays can lead to weakening of the response of immune system and even impairment of the immune system in extreme cases.

Aging of skin: exposure to UV rays can lead to acceleration of the aging process of your skin. This will result in you looking older than what you actually are. It can also lead to photo allergy that result in outbreak of rashes in fair skinned people

In humans, exposure to UV rays can also lead to difficulty in breathing, chest pain, and throat irritation and can even lead to hampering of lung function.

UV rays affect other life forms too. It adversely affects the different species of amphibians and is one of the prime reasons for the declining numbers of the amphibian species. It affects them in every stage of their life cycle; from hampering the growth and development in the larvae stage, deformities and decreases immunities in some species and to even retinal damage and blindness in some species.

UV rays also have adverse effect on the marine ecosystem. It adversely affects the planktons which plays a vital role in the food chain and oceanic carbon cycle. Affecting phytoplankton will in turn affect the whole ocean ecosystem.

UV rays will also affect the plants. UV radiations can alter the time of flowering in some plant species. It can also directly affect the plant growth by altering the physiological and developmental processes of the plants.

Effects of ozone depletion on environment

Ozone layer depletion leads to decrease in ozone in the stratosphere and increase in ozone present in the lower atmosphere. Presence of ozone in the lower atmosphere is considered as a pollutant and a greenhouse gas. Ozone in the lower atmosphere contributes to global warming and climate change. The depletion of ozone layer has trickle down effects in the form of global warming, which in turn leads to melting of polar ice, which will lead to rising sea levels and climatic changes around the world.

Advertisements